Brit Coaches Abroad: Jack Brazil

At 20 years old, he spent the summer as head coach of the Mongolian Premier League side Bayangol FC. Son of Gary, he's already seen more than most...

Last Updated: 21/08/14 at 10:00 Post Comment

Latest Articles

Comparing Three Man United Sides...

Post comment

We asked WhoScored to analyse Man United under Louis van Gaal, David Moyes and Sir Alex Ferguson. Now they have more possession and more long balls...

The, Erm, 'Best' Of Henry James Redknapp

2 comments

We don't know whether to laugh or tut, but Harry Redknapp has said more than a few things that merit repetition. He's definitely a dog man. And he can barely read and write...

All Articles

Jack Brazil, who's 20, spent the summer as head coach of the Mongolian Premier League side Bayangol FC. He is about to start the second year of a sports science degree at Coventry University. Here, he talks about life in Ulan Bator - and the glare of the Mongolian media...


When I walked through arrivals at the airport in Mongolia, it was a real 'wow' moment'.Mongolian TV is doing a reality show about the team, and so when I arrived, there was a camera crew in my face. I'd only been in the country 20 minutes, and I'm being interviewed by the telly. Later, I did an hour-long interview for them. It was full-on.


Coaching in the national stadium was another experience.We were playing FC Ulaanbataar in a friendly. I thought: "Hang on, I'm in a national stadium, managing against a FIFA-affiliated team...how did this happen?" And we came very close to beating them - we were 3-0 down, pulled it back to 3-2, and came very, very close in the last ten minutes.


Last summer, before I started uni, I was supposed to go to the Turks and Caicos to work with their FA. I'd emailed their technical director, and he said there was a coach transfer programme. But it fell through at the last minute. I ended up working in a restaurant and doing kids coaching. I thought: "I don't want to do this next summer."


I emailed every FA in the world. I sent them my CV, explained what I wanted to do, and told them I was passionate. And then I read an article about Paul Watson, who'd gone to coach Pohnpei in Micronesia, and wrote a book about it. Below the article was a comment from Enkhjin Bastumber - a Mongolian guy who wanted to get in touch with Paul.


Enkhjin wanted to revolutionise Mongolian football. He wanted to set up a new league that allowed everyone to play, rather than those that paid the right amount. So the Mongolian Premier League, which has 16 teams, is separate to the Mongolian Football Federation's league, which has seven teams. I added Enkhjin on Facebook and sent him a message.


Enkhjin brought Paul Watson out to Mongolia in the winter to set up Bayangol FC. He was doing trials, doing the futsal training, but he left earlier this year. So Enkhjin got in touch with me, and said: "The vacancy is there, would you be interested?"


When Enkhjin put the money in my account to fly out, I was excited - and very nervous. I knew I couldn't speak the language, and not many people speak English. And the weather is a challenge - one minute it's hot, the next it's dropped 15 celsius and you're standing around in five degrees. But I didn't want to keep myself in my comfort zone, like I had last summer. I wasn't paid, but I was offered flights, food, and accommodation.


We flew into Mongolia over the steppe. I see little gers, little huts, and I think: "What have I thrown myself into?" Enkhjin sorted me an apartment five minutes from the main square in Ulan Bator, but when I moved in I was like: "What is this?" I was sleeping on a camp bed with a sun lounger mattress on. Luckily, there was an English guy making a documentary over there, and for the first week he lived with me. He showed me the sights, showed me a few bars, places I could make friends. He was a really good guy.


There isn't much to do in Ulan Bator. There are several cinemas, bowling, an amusement park, but not much else. So you either stay in and put a film on, or you go out and meet your local friends. The problem is, the locals drink a lot. If I'm training at 7.30 in the morning, I can't really join in with that. A few times I went out and sat there with a glass of water.


When I came out, they wanted to train three times a week. But for me, if you want to create a professional footballer, you have to step it up. So I started a five-day programme - three football sessions, a recovery session, a fitness session, then a game every week. The league started this weekend, but sadly I had to come home early, as my granddad's not well.


We played two friendlies against teams from the Football Federation's league. We lost one 3-2 (against FC Ulaanbataar) and lost another 6-2. We also played in a tournament that was indicative of the state of Mongolian football. It was advertised as eight-a-side on a large pitch, and it was actually nine-a-side on what was - in British terms - a seven-a-side pitch.


The culture in Mongolia is completely different. You'd call training for 7.30am, and there'd be people turning up at 8.30 or 9. It's a laid-back, relaxed way of life - nothing like England. The standard isn't bad - there's some technically very good players, and they understand the game - but there isn't the physicality. And their lifestyles aren't great.


After one training session, I wanted to see how hydrated the players were. So I gave them water bottles, told them to go off and wee in them, and see what colour it was. The majority came back the colour of coffee. They weren't hydrated at all. It really opened my eyes. Some of the players had jobs; others just lived at home with their parents.


Because of my dad's role in football, I've always been interested in coaching (Gary Brazil is a former pro who managed Notts County and Nottingham Forest). Since I was young I've been inside football clubs. I've been very, very lucky to watch really good managers and coaches, and I did a year as a sports science intern at Nottingham Forest before uni. I knew by the age of 13 or 14 that I wasn't going to be a player, so I decided to coach.


My dad is really, really supportive. He always said: "Do what you want to do." If that's play, play; if that's coach, coach; if that's go into business, do that. But he wanted me to get my degree first. It's an unforgiving industry - you can be in and out of a job within six months, which my dad knows only too well. So you need something to fall back on.


If I go back to Mongolia next year, I don't want to do the same as before. I want to progress. So I might take my uni team on a tour there, as well as coaching Bayangol. I want to show the Mongolian players a higher standard. There has never been a professional Mongolian footballer in Europe - there's been one in the Thai second division - so Enkhjin wants to create Mongolian pros for Asian and European teams. That's the dream.


I'd love to coach abroad again. It's got a real pull for me. England would be lovely, it's where the big boys are, but realistically, the opportunity isn't there for a 20-year-old coach. I've also realised that coaches need a second language - Enkhjin translated for me in Mongolia, but if you want to work abroad, you need at least one other language.


This year, I've been given the head football activator role at Coventry University. That involves encouraging players at all levels, and coaching the seconds or the thirds. Last year I coached the fourth team - working alongside a manager, as they didn't want a fresher running a team on his own. So yeah, Coventry Uni fourths to Mongolian Premier League was a big leap.

Interview by @owenamos for britishcoachesabroad.com. Follow Jack @jackbraz29

Fair play to the lad. I'd like to think I 'd have no fear of heading off to the other side of the world to coach, but in truth, I don't have the cajones. Hopefully he can make a decent living out of it.
- mylsey

Football365 Facebook Fan Page

The Football365 fan page is a great place to meet like minded people, have football related discussions and make new friends.

Most Commented

Readers' Comments

S

ome of these are quality! Why you no like him F365?? :(

left right out
The, Erm, 'Best' Of Henry James Redknapp

W

e're our own worst enemy. We're suicidal in defence, and we may just get slaughtered on Sunday. Other than that, I am very pleased with my team.

bob the manc
Van Gaal: We can catch Chelsea

B

alotelli would've scored if the goals height was 3 times higher too...

footyfan52
Rodgers defends Balotelli

Latest Photos

Footer 365

Sky Bet League One: Bristol City held, by Bradford City Peterborough lose at Crewe

Bristol City were held by Bradford, but the 2-2 draw saw the Robins set a new club record for league games unbeaten.

Derby go top, Forest draw at Watford

Chris Martin's 81st-minute penalty sent Derby to the top of the league after the Rams grabbed a 1-0 win over Blackpool.

Champions League: Schalke leave it late to beat Sporting Lisbon 4-3

Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting scored a 92nd-minute penalty to earn Schalke a 4-3 win over Sporting Lisbon in Group G.

Mail Box

Are There Any Happy Fans Out There?

It seems as if Chelsea, West Ham and Southampton are the only content supporters right now. We have more doom and gloom for you. Who wants good news, eh..?

Is Van Gaal Just A Dutch Pardew?

A Mailbox of comparisons. Van Gaal is similar to Pardew, Wenger to Moyes, Van Persie to a spent force, and Pelle to a bloody gent. There's also plenty from last night...

© 2014 British Sky Broadcasting Ltd. All Rights Reserved A Sky Sports Digital Media property