Sacking season: PL clubs don’t panic until Christmas…

Date published: Wednesday 9th October 2019 7:59

The current international break appears to be a very convenient juncture to change a manager if Manchester United, Tottenham or Everton are so inclined. Two months into the season, this Premier League hiatus appears perfectly timed for any club to take decisive action. But in the last decade, it is not an opportunity many clubs have taken.

Only two clubs – Liverpool and Sunderland – have previously used this international break to change their manager and both did it in the same season when Brendan Rodgers and Dick Advocaat made for the door in 2015.

Indeed, of the 70 or so managerial changes to have been made or announced mid-season since 2009, only nine have taken place during an international break, including the most recent – Javi Gracia’s sacking at Watford.

The last decade has shown us that clubs don’t tend to start panicking until the festive period. December is comfortably the busiest time for mid-season managerial changes, with the fortnight around Christmas Day bringing nine sackings in the last ten years. Christmas goodwill certainly seems to run out after Boxing Day.

Of course, the end of the season in May is when most managerial changes are made.

Here’s the full list of exactly when clubs have been pushed into a managerial change since 2009.

* denotes managers replaced during an international break.

August – 2
9: Martin O’Neill (Aston Villa, 2010)*
14: Tony Pulis (West Brom, 2014)

September – 3
7: Javi Gracia (Watford, 2019)*
11: Frank de Boer (Crystal Palace, 2017)
22: Paolo Di Canio (Sunderland, 2013)

October – 7
3: Francesco Guidolin (Swansea, 2016)
4: Brendan Rodgers (Liverpool, 2015)*, Dick Advocaat (Sunderland, 2015)*
17: Craig Shakespeare (Leicester, 2017)
23: Ronald Koeman (Everton, 2017), Ian Holloway (Crystal Palace, 2013)
25: Tim Sherwood (Aston Villa, 2015)

November – 7
6: Slaven Bilic (West Ham, 2017)*
14: Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham, 2018)*
20: Tony Pulis (West Brom, 2017)
21: Roberto Di Matteo (Chelsea, 2012)
23: Mark Hughes (QPR, 2012)
24: Paul Hart (Portsmouth, 2009)
30: Steve Bruce (Sunderland, 2011)

December – 17
1: Martin Jol (Fulham, 2013)
3: Mark Hughes (Southampton, 2018)
6: Chris Hughton (Newcastle, 2010)
9: Garry Monk (Swansea, 2015)
13: Sam Allardyce (Blackburn, 2010)
14: Steve Clarke (West Brom, 2013)
16: Andre Villas-Boas (Tottenham, 2013)
17: Jose Mourinho (Chelsea, 2015)
18: Jose Mourinho (Manchester United, 2018)
19: Mark Hughes (Man City, 2009)
20: Paul Clement (Swansea, 2017)
22: Alan Pardew (Crystal Palace, 2016)
27: Bob Bradley (Swansea, 2016), Neil Warnock (Crystal Palace, 2014), Malky Mackay (Cardiff, 2013)
29: Alan Irvine (West Brom, 2014)
30: Gary Megson (Bolton, 2009)

January – 9
2: Alan Pardew (Newcastle, 2015)
3: Mike Phelan (Hull, 2017)
6: Mark Hughes (Stoke, 2018)
7: Roy Hodgson (Liverpool, 2011)
8: Neil Warnock (QPR, 2012), Owen Coyle (Burnley, 2010)
14: David Wagner (Huddersfield, 2019)
18: Nigel Adkins (Southampton, 2013)
21: Marco Silva (Watford, 2018)

February – 10
1: Manuel Pellegrini (Man City, 2016 – left at end of season)
3: Harry Redknapp (QPR, 2015)
4: Michael Laudrup (Swansea, 2014)
6: Roberto Di Matteo (West Brom, 2011)*
11: Paul Lambert (Aston Villa, 2015)
13: Mick McCarthy (Wolves, 2012)
14: Rene Meulensteen (Fulham, 2014)
23: Claudio Ranieri (Leicester, 2017)
24: Claude Puel (Leicester, 2019)
28: Claudio Ranieri (Fulham, 2019)

March – 9
4: Andre Villas-Boas (Chelsea, 2012)
11: Steve McClaren (Newcastle, 2016), Brian McDermott (Reading, 2013)
12: Mauricio Pellegrino (Southampton,2018)
15: Phil Brown (Hull, 2010)
16: Gus Poyet (Sunderland, 2015)
26: Aitor Karanka (Middlesbrough, 2017)*
29: Remi Garde (Aston Villa, 2016)*
30: Martin O’Neill (Sunderland, 2013)

April – 4
2: Alan Pardew (West Brom, 2018)
6: Chris Hughton (Norwich, 2014)
20: Arsene Wenger (Arsenal, 2018 – left at end of season)
22: David Moyes (Man Utd, 2014)

May – 29
8: Sir Alex Ferguson (Man Utd, 2013 – left at end of season)
9: David Moyes (Everton, 2013)
10: Carlos Carvalhal (Swansea, 2018)
11: Gianfranco Zola (West Ham, 2010)
12: Roberto Martinez (Everton, 2016), Pepe Mel, (West Brom, 2014)
13: Chris Hughton (Brighton, 2019), Quique Sanchez Flores (Watford, 2016), Tim Sherwood (Tottenham, 2014), Roberto Mancini (Man City, 2013)
14: Roy Hodgson (West Brom, 2012), Alex McLeish (Aston Villa, 2012)
15: Avram Grant (West Ham, 2011)
16: David Moyes (West Ham, 2018), Kenny Dalglish (Liverpool, 2012)
18: Paul Lambert (Stoke, 2018)
20: Avram Grant (Portsmouth, 2009)
21: Tony Pulis (Stoke, 2013)
22: Walter Mazzarri (Watford, 2017), David Moyes (Sunderland, 2017), Carlo Ancelotti (Chelsea (2011)
23: Sam Allardyce (Crystal Palace, 2017), Louis van Gaal (Man Utd, 2016)
24: Sam Allardyce (West Ham, 2015)
25: Marco Silva (Hull, 2017)
26: Mauricio Pochettino (Southampton, 2014), Rafael Benitez (Chelsea, 2013)
28: Roberto Martinez (Wigan, 2013)
30: Brendan Rodgers (Swansea, 2012)

June – 11
1: Paul Lambert (Norwich, 2012), Gerard Houllier (Aston Villa, 2011)
3: Rafael Benitez (Liverpool, 2010)
13: Ronald Koeman (Southampton, 2016), Harry Redknapp (Tottenham, 2012)
14: Claude Puel (Southampton, 2017)
16: Maurizio Sarri (Chelsea, 2019)
24: Rafael Benitez (Newcastle, 2019),
30: Guus Hiddink (Chelsea, 2016), Nigel Pearson (Leicester, 2015), Roy Hodgson (Fulham, 2010)

July – 3
13: Antonio Conte (Chelsea, 2018)
21: Sam Allardyce (Sunderland, 2016)
22: Steve Bruce (Hull, 2016)

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